Crime Prevention WebQuest



Introduction

One of the most controversial subjects in most communities is crime prevention--not if it's a good thing or not, most everyone wants to prevent crime, but how to go about it.

In this WebQuest you will take part in a town meeting--an open meeting for all interested citizens of a community to solve a common problem.

In groups you will take the roles of different interest groups in the community. The Quest

Your community has noted a sharp increase in all types of crimes and now people want to do something about it. The only problem is no one can agree on the causes or how to solve the problem. Your goal: Decide why crime has been increasing and how your community should go about preventing it. As a result, your community has decided to have a town meeting in which all interested parties will have an opportunity to present their ideas. You will represent your interests at the meeting. Be sure you have facts to back up your ideas. Videos, charts, pictures or demonstrations might help you. Continue on the the Instructions.

Instructions

In this WebQuest you will be working together with a group of students in class. Each group will represent a specific interest group. As a member of the group you will explore various websites from people all over the world who care about Crime Prevention from a specific point of view. Take notes of their ideas so you can use them in preparing your presentation. You'll be taking your presentation to a special Town Meeting, so be sure you have all the facts you need to convince the others of your point of view.

You'll begin with everyone in your class getting some general background information before dividing into roles where people on your team become experts on one part of the topic. Continue on to General Background Information.

General Background

Use the Internet information linked below to answer the basic questions of how you can prevent crime. When you finish, discuss with your classmates general crime prevention ideas. Compare experiences.

Sheriff Brass' Crime Prevention Unit - An introduction to crime prevention
http://www.geocities.com/CapitolHill/1591/

Discuss these questions:

1. What three elements must be present for a crime to occur?
2. How can you remove the desire to commit a crime?
3. What organizations work in education?
4. What does "incarceration" mean?
5. What three ways can the opportunity to commit a crime be removed?
6. What does UCR refer to? Visit the link.

Now continue on to the Group Work instructions.

Group work Instructions

Now is the time for you to divide into groups. You can do this at random or based on your interests.

1. Each group will take roles and explore their different points of view.

2. Read through the files linked to your group. If you print out the files, underline the passages that you feel are the most important. If you look at the files on the computer, copy sections you feel are important by dragging the mouse across the passage and copying / pasting it into a word processor or other writing software.

3. Note: Remember to write down or copy/paste the URL of the file you take the passage from so you can quickly go back to it if you need to to prove your point.

4. Be prepared to focus what you've learned into one main opinion that clearly states your opinions.

The groups are:
(Group 1) Citizen's Groups against Crime--you think organizing ordinary people like yourselves is the best way to fight crime
(Group 2) Self Defense-you think only through learning self-defense techniques can people save themselves and their property from crime.
(Group 3) Official Police Organizations-you are members of your local police force.
(Group 4) Organized Crime-you believe organized crime is responsible for the increase in crime in your community.

When you finish your research, move on to the Town Meeting Instructions.

Group 1: Citizen's Groups against Crime

You will represent a group of people who have organized themselves to fight crime--either directly or through trying to prevent crime in your community.
Look through these sites and see what types of activities these groups have developed and design your own group.
Be sure to define your group as clearly as possible. What is your philosophy? How does your group think crime should be fought or prevented? Collect facts and examples to support your point of view.

Fugitive Watch- A community watch for finding criminals. (http://www.fugitive.com/)

Guardian Angels- An organization for citizen self protection. (http://www.guardianangels.org/)

National Association Citizens on Patrol- A Non profit Organization supporting over 4,000 Citizen Patrol Volunteers in over 62 cities in 10 states. (http://www.nacop.org/)

Teens, Crime and the Community- An organization to get teenagers involved in crime prevention. (http://www.ncpc.org/programs/tcc/)

Silent Observer - A local crime stopper program. (http://www.silentobserver.org/)

Group 2: Self Defense

You are people who believe the best way to prevent crime is to protect yourselves. You know there is a place for the police and other groups, but you'd rather find an individual solution.
Look through these sites and prepare yourselves to explain or even demonstrate what kinds of self defense and crime prevention you believe in. Collect facts and examples that you can use to support your arguments at the Town Meeting.

Being Safe on Campus- Tips on how to keep safe on your university campus. (http://www.safetycops.com/campus_safety.htm)

Defensive Tactics: Defense University - How to protect yourself from attack.(http://www.defendu.com/defend_university.htm)

Home Security Store- Alarms for home protection. (http://www.norcoalarms.com/)

Violence Prevention- Self defense for women. (http://www.lacaaw.org/guidelines.html)

Unarmed Self-Defense - Some simple self defense techniques. (http://ar.essortment.com/selfdefensetec_rfmo.htm)

Effective Strategy:Providing Self-Protection Courses for Women - Crime Prevention hints (http://www.ncpc.org/ncpc/ncpc/?pg=2088-9028)

Preventing School Violence- Preventing school shootings and violence. (http://www.reason.org/ps234.html)

Group 3: Official Police Organizations

Your group represents the official police organization of your community.
Look through the following links and get a good overview of what kinds of activities law enforcement agencies throughout the world undertake to prevent crime.
Clearly plan what you think your local police department should do in your community. How do you think crime can be prevented? Find lots of examples from around the world. Collect facts and examples that you can use to support your arguments at the Town Meeting.

Alaska State Troopers- Law enforcement in the northern state of Alaska. (http://www.dps.state.ak.us/ast/)

Community Policing- A new way of policing. (http://www.policing.com/articles/index.html)

The FBI - What is the purpose of the FBI. (http://www.fbi.gov/priorities/priorities.htm)

Interpol - The home page of the famous international police force. (http://www.interpol.com/)

New Zealand Police- Law enforcement in New Zealand. (http://www.police.govt.nz/)

Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department - From West Hollywood. (http://www.wehosheriff.com/)

New York Police Department - The home page of the NY City Police Department. (http://www.ci.nyc.ny.us/html/nypd/)

Police Services in the UK - Police organizations in England, Wales, Scotland, No. Ireland. (http://www.police.uk/)

Royal Canadian Mounted Police - The famous Canadian Police Force (http://www.rcmp-grc.gc.ca/index_e.htm)

Group 4: Organized Crime

You are a group of people that is convinced the major problem facing your community is organized crime.
Look at the following links and decide which kinds of organized crime are the most dangerous in your community and then think about how this kind of crime can be controlled. Be prepared to explain exactly how the criminal organization is working in your community. Collect facts and examples that you can use to support your arguments at the Town Meeting.

American Mafia.com - The Mafia in the US in the past and present. (http://americanmafia.com/)

The Drug Wars - A 30-year history of America's war on drugs. (http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/pages/frontline/shows/drugs/)

Hackers - Hackers and internet insecurity. (http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/pages/frontline/shows/hackers/)

Murder, Money and Mexico - Mexican organized crime. (http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/pages/frontline/shows/mexico/)

Gangs in Los Angeles - Blood gangs, crip gangs...everything about gangs. (http://www.streetgangs.com/)

Yakuza - The Japanese mafia. (http://w1.313.telia.com/~u31302275/yakuza6.htm)

Gangsters Incorporated: The Russian Mafia - The crime organization of Russia. (http://gangstersinc.tripod.com/Rus.html)

Town Meeting Instructions

Now you should have your Town Meeting. Be prepared to defend your positions, but also be flexible. A group with other interests might have ideas you could also agree with. Appoint someone to be in charge of the meeting. This person can call on people to participate and even limit talking time so everyone can have a chance to talk.

At the end of your meeting, make of list of actions you all agree upon and talk about how you could carry them out. Once you have come to a conclusion, move on to Real World Feedback.

Real World Feedback

You and your teammates have learned a lot by dividing up into different roles. Now's the time to put your learning into a letter you'll send out for real world feedback. Together you will write a letter that contains opinions, information, and perspectives that you've gained. Follow one of the two following processes: Each group can write a letter stating their own ideas:

1. Begin your letter with a statement of who you are and why you are writing your message to this particular person or organization.

2. Give background information that shows you understand the topic.

3. Write a paragraph that gives two good reasons supporting the group's opinion. Make sure to be specific in both the information (like where you got it from on the Web) and the reasoning (why the information proves your group's point).

4. Have each person on the team proofread the message. Use correct letter format and make sure you have correctly addressed the email message. Use the link below to make contact. You will be writing to the Fairfield, Connecticut Police Department which has a special service to supply general information to the public about police work. Send your message and make sure your teacher gets a copy.

Your Contact is: Ask a Police Officer (http://www.fpdct.com/ask_a_police_officer.htm)

OR

The class as a whole can collaborate on the letter.

1. Begin your letter with a statement of who you are and why you are writing your message to this particular person or organization.

2. Give background information that shows you understand the topic. Here you can describe your town meeting and the various opinions that were represented.

3. Finish your letter with a paragraph that gives two good reasons supporting the entire group's conclusion. Make sure to be specific in both the information (like where you got it from on the Web) and the reasoning (why the information proves your group's point).

4. Have each person on the team proofread the message. Use correct letter format and make sure you have correctly addressed the email message. Use the link below to make contact. You will be writing to the Fairfield, Connecticut Police Department which has a special service to supply general information to the public about police work. Send your message and make sure your teacher gets a copy.

Your Contact is: Ask a Police Officer (http://www.fpdct.com/ask_a_police_officer.htm)

Teacher's Notes

LEVEL: Upper Intermediate to Advanced

A WebQuest presents student groups with a challenging task, scenario, or problem to solve. It should be done in groups and ideally will involve a lot of interaction in the groups and among the different groups.

This WebQuest is based on a common problem: crime and organized around a town meeting, an informal debate, where different interest groups present their opinions and a general discussion should lead to a consensus.

Present the activities in this order:

Introduction: This presents the general scenario. Go over it with the students.

Instructions: This page explains what the students will be doing and why.

General Background: In order to carry out the group tasks easily, all students begin by learning some common background knowledge. The website they visit will give them this knowledge. Discuss the answers to the questions with the whole class.

Group Work Instructions:This page will help you divide the students into groups so they can investigate the aspect they will be presenting in the town meeting. There are four groups: Citizens groups against crime, Self defense, Official police organizations, and Organized crime. Each group has their own webpage which supplies links they can use to find information.

Town Meeting: The town meeting is an informal debate. Each group should present their ideas, supporting them with facts (they can use power point, video, charts, etc. to present the facts). They must try to convince the other students their ideas are the correct ones. It is a good idea to set up some debate rules and perhaps put one student in charge keeping time and calling on speakers. After each presentation is made, a general discussion should follow. Students can then change sides, agree with other groups, or continue supporting their ideas.

Real Life Feedback:In this section, students must synthesize their learning by completing a summarizing act, in this case, writing a letter and sending it to a real world expert on the topic. They can either do this in their original groups or, if the town meeting came to a consensus, write one letter from the whole group. Specific instructions are on the students' page.

       
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